Posts Tagged ‘digital music

08
May
13

Book Review: Music Business and the Experience Economy. The Australasian Case

Cover Music Business and the Experience Economy“Music Business and the Experience Economy” is the first book on the music business in Australasia from an academic perspective. In a cross-disciplinary approach, the authors deal with a wide-range of topics concerning the production, distribution and consumption in the digital age. The interrelationship of legal, aesthetic and economic aspects in the production of music in Australasia is also highlighted as well as the emergence of new business models, the role of music file sharing, and the live music sector. In addition, the impact of the digital revolution on music experience and valuation, the role of music for sports and branding, and last but not least the developments of tertiary music education, are discussed from different perspectives.

Peter Tschmuck, Philip L. Pearce and Steven Campbell (eds.), 2013, Music Business and the Experience Economy. The Australasian Case. Heidelberg & New York: Springer, ISBN: 978-3-642-27897-6.

For a more detailed book review please click here for further reading.

Continue reading ‘Book Review: Music Business and the Experience Economy. The Australasian Case’

15
Mar
13

Music Experience and Behaviour in Young People in the UK

The study Music Experience and Behaviour in Young People is the third survey of its kind – after 2008 and 2009 – for 2011. After a presentation of the key findings of the study in the 3rd Vienna Music Business Research Days, it’s now an honour and pleasure to exclusively present the results of the current study on the blog. The 2011 study is based on a comprehensive online survey of 1,888 of 14-24 year olds across the UK. The main conclusion of the current research is “(…) that when it comes to music and young people, everything is different, and yet everything is still the same”; compared to 2008 and 2009.

The key findings of the 2011 study are:

  • The computer is no longer their main entertainment hub.
  • Digital music collections are still huge.
  • Digital music collections still contain 50 percent “free” music.
  • Ownership is still important.
  • Music is no longer the most popular entertainment type.
  • There remains a very clear “value gap”.
  • The popularity of file sharing has changed significantly.
  • The 14-25 years olds are prepared to pay for digital music.
  • But there are still challenges for streaming music online.
  • Digital music consumption is still complex.
  • They have a clear understanding and grasp of what copyright law is.

Please read further if you want to know more about the research results.

Continue reading ‘Music Experience and Behaviour in Young People in the UK’

30
Dec
12

A Brief History of China’s Music Industry – Part 4: The Contemporary Digital Music Industry in China

The music industry of China is an unknown continent from a Western music business research perspective. Therefore it is very meritorious that John Fangjun Li, a lecturer and PhD candidate (2008-2012) at Macquarie University, provides one of the first overviews of the history of China’s music industry for an international readership. In a series of four blog contributions he highlights the development of the recorded music industry in more than 100 years from the final period of Imperial China to the current Peoples Republic of China. He gives an overview of the impact of Western major recorded music companies in the first half of the 20th century and of the emergence of serveral state operated but also privately owned Chinese companies after the Great Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) in Shanghai, Guangzhou, Beijing and other large cities. He also highlights the current digital music business in China that has been dominating the recorded music industry since the the mid 2000s.

In the fourth and final part of the series on China’s music industry, John Fangjun Li highlights the current situation in the recorded music industry in China, which is totally occupied by digital online and mobile music services.

Continue reading ‘A Brief History of China’s Music Industry – Part 4: The Contemporary Digital Music Industry in China’

08
Feb
12

Peter Jenner on the Digital Revolution in the Music Industry and the Need for an International Music Registry

On November 23, 2011 the British music manager and record producer Peter Jenner gave a talk on the digital revolution in the music industry and the need for an International Music Registry (IMR) at the Institute of Culture Management and Culture Studies (IKM) of the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. Peter Jenner has managed Pink Floyd, T Rex, Ian Dury, Roy Harper, The Clash, The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy, Robyn Hitchcock, Baaba Maal and Eddi Reader (Fairground Attraction), Billy Bragg and others. He works at Sincere Management and was the Secretary General of the International Music Managers’ Forum, a director of the UK Music Managers’ Forum and is involved on the advisory board of the Featured Artists Coalition. Currently he is a consultant for the World Intellectual Property Rights Organization (WIPO) to help in the development of  an International Music Registry. More on this project and the rationale behind it can be read in the following abridged version of Peter Jenner’s talk, which was not only authorised but also edited by himself.

Continue reading ‘Peter Jenner on the Digital Revolution in the Music Industry and the Need for an International Music Registry’

22
Mar
10

The CD is dead! Long live the music download?

The economic crisis exacerbates the recession in the music industry. Recorded music sales have been in sharply decline for years. Digital music offerings on the Internet and via mobile phone cannot compensate for the losses. One reason: The wrong licensing policies of the record labels.

The music industry cannot escape the general economic and financial crisis. In 2008 a dramatic slump in sales of recorded music for nearly all markets was reported. But the economic crisis only reinforces a downturn in the market for recorded music that begun already in the late 1990s. Thus, in the largest music markets the CD unit sales dropped in the period from 2000 to 2008 between 35% (United Kingdom) and 59% (USA). This recession, however, is a symptom of a paradigm shift from music delivered in form of a physical product to music as a service delivered in form of online and mobile music offerings. Continue reading ‘The CD is dead! Long live the music download?’




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