Posts Tagged ‘Future of Music Coalition

23
Sep
14

Introducing our guests: Kristin Thomson, Consultant for Future of Music Coalition

The 5th Vienna Music Business Research Days will be held at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna from Oct 1-3, 2014.  A mixed group of music business professionals and music business researcher will highlight the question on “How to Monetize Music in the Digital Age” from different perspectives. All conference guest that will present/discuss on Oct 2, 2014 in Joseph Haydn-Hall will be introduced in a short blog series.

Kristin Thomson 2011Kristin Thomson, who is a consultant for Future of Music Coalition gives a presentation on the income sources of U.S. musicians in the digital age on Oct 2, 2014 from 14.00-14.45 in Joseph Haydn-Hall.

Kristin Thomson is a community organizer, social policy researcher, entrepreneur and musician. After graduating with a BA in Sociology from Colorado College in 1989, Kristin moved to Washington, DC where she worked for two years as a national action organizer for the National Organization for Women. She left NOW in 1992 to make a full-time commitment to Simple Machines, an independent record label she co-ran with Jenny Toomey. Over the label’s 8-year history, Simple Machines released over seventy records and CDs, published the Mechanic’s Guide to Putting Out Records, Cassettes, and CDs, and organized three high-profile music festivals in Washington, DC. While running the label, Kristin and Jenny also wrote, recorded and released four highly-acclaimed Tsunami records on Simple Machines, and toured the US, Canada, England and Europe extensively.

After Simple Machines stopped putting out new records in 1998, Kristin permanently relocated to Philadelphia, PA. In 2001, Kristin graduated with a Masters in Urban Affairs and Public Policy from the University of Delaware. During her graduate program she was a recipient of a School of Urban Affairs and Public Policy Fellowship, and the Urban Affairs Association Award that recognized her thesis, The Internet as an Agent of Change, as a valuable contribution to the body of usable social knowledge.

She has been with the Future of Music Coalition since 2001 and has overseen project management, research and event programming, including Future of Music Policy Summits from 2002-2007. In 2011-12, Kristin became a consultant for FMC, and served as Co-Director of the multi-method Artist Revenue Streams research project. She was also the main author of Arts Organizations and Digital Technologies, released by Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project in January 2013. She also works with consumer privacy expert Ashkan Soltani. She lives near Philadelphia with her husband Bryan Dilworth, a concert promoter, and their son, where she also plays guitar in the lady-powered band, Ken.

Click for the detailed conference programme here: http://musicbusinessresearch.wordpress.com/vienna-music-business-research-days-2/

26
Sep
13

Is Streaming the Next Big Thing? – The artists’ perspective

In mid of July 2013 Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke caused for controversies when he pulled his song catalogue and those of his band Atoms For Peace from music streaming service Spotify. His straight forward argument was as cited in The Guardian that “new artists get paid fuck all with this model”. Several artists take the same line as Yorke. The co-author of the Belinda Carlisle hit “Heaven is a Place on Earth”, Ellen Shipley, complained that the royalty paid by Pandora to her for more than 3m plays was US$ 40. She accused Pandora, Spotify, YouTube and Google for “(…) the meager, insulting, outrageous amount of money songwriters are being paid” according to Business Insider. In fact some big names are not available on Spotify: The Beatles, AC/DC, The Eagles, Garth Brooks, George Harrison.

Thus, the question arises if and how music streaming services can be valuable for artists? In the following I would like to highlight the pros and cons of music streaming services form an artists’ perspective.

Continue reading ‘Is Streaming the Next Big Thing? – The artists’ perspective’




October 2014
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Archive

Twitter

Categories

Blog Stats

  • 198,939 hits

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 96 other followers