Posts Tagged ‘music industry

14
Jul
14

Is piracy ‘good’ or ‘bad’? – guest post by Steven Brown

Steven Brown is a Doctoral Research Student at Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland. His mixed-methods research into music piracy has appeared in diverse publications including The Psychologist,  Musicae Scientae, and Convergence.

In his guest post he reflects his long experience in the psychology in music piracy research to question if piracy is economically ‘bad’ or ‘good’. He comes to the conslusion that the answer is strongly dependent on the methodology used in the research. This is in line with my findings in the blog series “How Bad is Music File Sharing?”

Read more on Steven’s thoughts on music file sharing research here:

Continue reading ‘Is piracy ‘good’ or ‘bad’? – guest post by Steven Brown’

31
Dec
13

Music Business Research 2013 – in retrospective

 

Dear readers of the music business research blog,

The take-over of EMI’s recorded music arm by Universal Music Group was still on the agenda in 2013. The EU Commission ordered Universal Music to divest EMI Recording Ltd. (including EMI’s Parlophone label group, with the exception of the Beatles), Chrysalis (but without the Robbie Williams catalogue) and Mute Records, EMI and Virgin Classical as well as the local EMI branches in France, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Poland, Czech Republic/Slovakia and Universal Greece. Thus, the Parlophone Music Group was sold to Warner Music for GBP 487m. The EU Commission eventually cleared the deal in May 2013.

2013 was also the year of booming music streaming services. Led by Spotify, music streaming services reported a growing number of users and increasing revenues. The market entry of Apple with iTunes Radio and Google with All Access raised the expectations of a turnaround in the recorded music market. In the series of six blog entries “Is Streaming the Next Big Thing?”, I tried to assess if these expectations are legitimate from the labels’, artists’, consumers’ and streaming services’ perspective on the basis of an international market analysis.

The booming music streaming market was the perfect starting point for the 4th Vienna Music Business Research Days “The Future of Music Licensing” (June, 20-21, 2013). The role of collecting societies in the digital age was as well discussed as the EU directive on collective rights management and the need for a comprehensive database of music licences. In the course of the VMBR-Days the best paper of the Young Scholars’ Workshop was awarded for the second time. Sisley Maillard of the Université Telecom ParisTech was awarded for her paper “Consumer Information in the Digital Age: Empirical Evidence from the Spillovers in the Music Industry” as well as Francisco Bernardo/Luis Gustavo Martins of the Catholic University of Portugal in Porto for “Disintermediation Effects in the Music Business – A Return to Old Times”. Both papers are considered for publication in the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR).

In 2013, the second volume of the IJMBR was published with two issues in April and October. The special October issue was entirely devoted to the analysis of the Australian music economy:

Volume 2, no 2, October 2013 – special issue on the Australian Music Economy

Editorial by Patrik Wikström and Peter Tschmuck

Guy Morrow: Regulating Artist Managers: An Insider’s Perspective, pp. 8-35

Phillip McIntyre and Gaye Sheather: The Newcastle Music Industry: An Ethnographic Study of a Regional Creative System in Action, pp. 36-60

Diane Hughes, Sarah Keith, Guy Morrow, Mark Evans and Denis Crowdy: What constitutes artist success in the Australian music industries? pp. 60-80

Volume 2, no 1, April 2013

Editorial by Dennis Collopy and Peter Tschmuck

Michael Huber: Music Reception in the Digital Age – Empirical Research on New Patterns of Musical Behaviour, pp. 6-34

Juan D. Montoro-Pons, Manuel Cuadrado García and Trinidad Casasús-Estellés: Analysing the Popular Music Audience. Determinants of Participation and Frequency of Attendance, pp. 35-62

John Fangjun Li: The Development of the Digital Music Industry in China during the First Decade of the 21st Century with Particular Regard to Industrial Convergence, pp. 63-86

 

In the next section you can find a list of all theses & papers which were added to the blog in 2013, but also recently published studies and books related to music business/industry research are listed:

Continue reading ‘Music Business Research 2013 – in retrospective’

30
Oct
13

Book Review: The Death & Life of the Music Industry in the Digital Age by Jim Rogers

Rogers, 2013, CoverJim Rogers’ PhD-thesis at Dublin City University was recently published under the title “The Death & Life of the Music Industry in the Digital Age” at Bloomsbury/London. He interviewed 30 music business professionals in the UK and Ireland from 2007 to 2010 to answer the main research question if the Internet caused a crisis in the music industry that is signalling its final collapse or if it, in contrast, resulted in an intensive restructuring and reordering within the industry.

He concludes that the music industry has not undergone a fundamental structural upheaval but was reshaped by an evolutionary change. Rogers observes more continuities than discontinuities in the music industry and states that most of the music industry actors do more or less the same things but in a different way. In the following I highlight how the author comes to such a conclusion.

Continue reading ‘Book Review: The Death & Life of the Music Industry in the Digital Age by Jim Rogers’

04
Jul
13

Book Review: “Download!” by Phil Hardy

Phil Hardy, Download-cover“Download! How the Internet Transformed the Record Business” by music industry journalist Phil Hardy is a detailed analysis how the majors record companies lost control of the value added chain in the music industry in the digital revolution. He tells the story about self-confident and maybe arrogant music business executives, who had profited from the CD revolution in the 1990s, but were outmanoeuvred by industry outsiders who set up a totally new added value network for recorded music. The once highly profitable record business that attracted investors from other industries in the 1980s and 1990s turned into a laboratory of digitalization with declining record sales, job losses and divestments of pressing plants and distribution networks in the 2000s. “Download!” is, therefore, an important contribution to understand the impact of Internet and new media on the transformation of the recorded music industry.

Continue reading ‘Book Review: “Download!” by Phil Hardy’

28
Oct
12

International Journal of Music Business Research, vol. 1, no. 2, October 2012

In the recently published issue of the International Journal of Music Business Research the following articles are included:

Customer experience management in the music industry online communities by Jari Salo, Professor of Marketing at the Oulu Business School/Finland.

The new artrepreneur – how artists can thrive on a networked music business by Maike Engelmann, Lorenz Grünewald and Julia Heinrich, best paper award winner of the Young Scholars’ Workshop of the 3rd Vienna Music Business Research Days 2012.

How media prosumers contribute to social innovation in today’s new networked music culture and economy by Carsten Winter, Full Professor for Media and Music Management at the Department of Journalism and Communication Research (IJK) at Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media/Germany.

Click here for full version vol. 1, no. 2, October 2012 of the International Journal of Music Business Research

Continue reading ‘International Journal of Music Business Research, vol. 1, no. 2, October 2012′

01
Aug
12

Australian Music Business – An Analysis of the ARIA Charts, 1988-2011 – Part 1

In this blog the early music industry in Australia was analysed in great detail (The Early Record Industry in Australia – part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5 and part 6). In a four part series on the Australian music business I would like to highlight the recent economic situation of the Australian music industry. In the first part of this series the charts of the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) are analysed to understand the consumers’ taste downunder especially in respect to the Australian national repertoire. In the second part the question is answered, which labels benefited from the chart successes of international and domestic artists. In a third part the development of the recorded music sales in Australia from 2000 to 2011 is analysed to give an explanation for the ups and downs in the observed period. In the fourth and last part of the series the economic role of collecting societies in Australia is highlighted especially from the licensing income’s perspective.

However, in the following the question is answered what artists were appreciated most by Australian music consumers and thus benefited by successes in the ARIA charts.

Continue reading ‘Australian Music Business – An Analysis of the ARIA Charts, 1988-2011 – Part 1′

19
Apr
12

Creativity and Innovation in der Music Industry – 2nd edition

It is unusual to make a review of a book’s second edition. However, when “Creativity and Innovation in the Music Industry” was published in 2006 the outcome of the great transformation process of the music industry was anything than clear. Therefore, it was a great opportunity to revisit the developments in the music industry in the first five years after the millenium and to extent the historic analysis until 2011. This results in a total revision of the chapter on the “Digital Revolution” in the music industry. In the revised version the ongoing process of oligopolization of the recorded music industry is highlighted as well as the market entry of players from outside the industry in the music market. It is also shown that the digital revolution has transformed an initially album driven to a single track market that accounts for the sales slump of recorded music rather than file sharing did – as I pointed out extensively in this blog. However, the main finding in the second edition is that the digital revolution does not only create a totally new value-added network in the music indutsry, but results also in the emergence of a new aesthetic paradigm, just as Jazz became in the 1920s and Rock ‘n’ Roll in the 1950s. Therefore we can call the current paradigm shift in the music industry the “Digital Music Revolution”, since electronic dance music has the potential to impact the music creation for decades. “Instead of a song, which can be attributed to creators, a digital track can be used, changed, mixed and transformed. Music, therefore, will become fluid, which will chnage not only the existing copyright regime but also the meaning of music in a new social and cultural context” (pp. 196).

 

Peter Tschmuck, 2012, Creativity and Innovation in the Music Industry, 2nd edition, Springer Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-642-28429-8, e-ISBN 978-3-642-28430-4

Print copies can be directly ordered from Springer Publishing. However single book chapters are also available as an eBook version.

03
Apr
12

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2012, vol. 1, no. 1

One might wonder if there is a need for an academic journal on the music business. Several high-profile trade publications on the music business are published regularly and in the torrent of academic journals one can find titles that focus on popular music, the creative industries, cultural economics and arts management. Nevertheless, there is a gap for a publication wholly dedicated to the academic research of music business and industry topics. The International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR) tries to fill this gap by providing a new platform for publication of articles on the phenomena of the music economy from different scientific perspectives.

The first issue of the IJMBR reflects a wide range of music business research topics that fit within the scope of the journal’s remit. In a theoretical piece, Patrik Wikström argues that the economic value created from recorded music is increasingly based on context rather than on ownership and that the focus of music distribution should shift from download and streaming to contextual models of music experience. The second paper is contributed by Pinie Wang, who highlights, in a historical analysis, the complex inter-relationship between the US media, advertising and music industries. Martin Kretschmer then addresses his contribution to the recent EU-copyright term extension for sound recordings, proposing that copyright interests should be transferable only for an initial term of 10 years, after which they will revert to the creator. This should lead to a remarkable decrease in orphaned work and should foster creativity and innovation.


Click here for the first issue of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR)

If you want to submit an article for publication in the IJMBR please send it to: music.business.research@gmail.com

08
Feb
12

Peter Jenner on the Digital Revolution in the Music Industry and the Need for an International Music Registry

On November 23, 2011 the British music manager and record producer Peter Jenner gave a talk on the digital revolution in the music industry and the need for an International Music Registry (IMR) at the Institute of Culture Management and Culture Studies (IKM) of the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. Peter Jenner has managed Pink Floyd, T Rex, Ian Dury, Roy Harper, The Clash, The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy, Robyn Hitchcock, Baaba Maal and Eddi Reader (Fairground Attraction), Billy Bragg and others. He works at Sincere Management and was the Secretary General of the International Music Managers’ Forum, a director of the UK Music Managers’ Forum and is involved on the advisory board of the Featured Artists Coalition. Currently he is a consultant for the World Intellectual Property Rights Organization (WIPO) to help in the development of  an International Music Registry. More on this project and the rationale behind it can be read in the following abridged version of Peter Jenner’s talk, which was not only authorised but also edited by himself.

Continue reading ‘Peter Jenner on the Digital Revolution in the Music Industry and the Need for an International Music Registry’




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