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30
Jun
16

The Music Streaming Market Revisited, 2011-2015

Last year, I posted an analysis of the international music streaming for 2014 based on IFPI numbers. Since then the global streaming market was highly dynamic and therefore I updated my analysis and included also earlier data. In 2015 the global streaming revenue (subscriptions and ad-supported streaming revenue) increased by 42.5 per cent (IFPI 2016: 17) and had a volume of US $2.89bn. The music streaming market is almost as big as the music download market (US $2.97bn) (IFPI 2016: 49). Music streaming, therefore, accounts for 42 per cent of the global recorded music market. However, the market share of music streaming differs between countries. Whereas in Sweden the music streaming market share is 66.5 per cent of the overall recorded music market, in Germany just 11.4 per cent of the recorded music revenue comes from music streaming sources. And Japan, the second largest recorded music market in world, lags behind with meagre 4.6 per cent. In the following, please read an analysis of the international music streaming for the time-span from 2011-2015.

Animation of the international music streaming markets, 2011-2015

Continue reading ‘The Music Streaming Market Revisited, 2011-2015’

27
Apr
16

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2016, vol. 5, no. 1

The new issue features three excellent unique and diverse papers that shed fresh and novel insights on the modern music business and this is exemplified by “Rockonomics Revisited”, as well as “Innovation Diffusion” and “The Distinctiveness of Electronic Dance Music”.

Rockonomics Revisited” by Adam Fer and Barbara Baarsma of the University of Amsterdam is taking its reference point as Krueger’s well-known 2005 “Rockonomics” paper that examined the complimentary relationship between declining record sales and rising ticket prices. The “Innovation Diffusion” paper by Alexander Brem (University of Southern Denmark) and Michael Reichert (Helmut Schmidt University Hamburg) investigates the importance of product and organisational Innovation particularly in a music industry with historical failure rates of 90 percent. “The distinctiveness of Electronic Dance Music” by Job van der Velde and Erik Hitters of Erasmus University Rotterdam begs the question whether the Dance (or EDM) genre is distinctive relative to existing music industries structures. They argue the differences between the EDM labels and rest of the music industry can be traced to the embedded digital technologies, the rise of independent labels filling the post-Napster vacuum left by the major labels and the fact the new entrants focus on live as opposed to recorded music revenues. A book review by Daniel Nordgård on “Business Innovation and Disruptions in the Music Industry”, edited by Patrik Wikström and Robert DeFillippi, complements for the first time the current IJMBR issue.

 

Volume 5, no 1, April 2016

Editorial by Dennis Collopy, pp. 4-5

Adam Fer & Barbara Baarsma: Rockonomics revisited: The rise of music streaming services and the effect on the concert industry, pp. 6-35

Alexander Brem & Michael Reichert: Innovation diffusion in B2B relations: New song diffusion in radio broadcasting, pp. 36-58

Job van der Velden & Erik Hitters: The distinctiveness of Electronic Dance Music. Challenging mainstream routines and structures in the music industries, pp. 59-84

Book review by Daniel Nordgård: Business innovation and disruptions in the music industry (eds. Wikström, P. & DeFillippi, R.), pp. 85-90

 

18
Sep
15

Introducing our guests: Dagmar Abfalter (University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna)

Foto Dagmar AbfalterThe 6th Vienna Music Business Research Days 2015 focus on “Financing Music in the Digital Age”. International experts and academics discuss new and alternative revenue sources for the music scene such as music streaming for the classic music business, crowdfunding and business angel funding.

Dagmar Abfalter and Serge Poisson-de Haro are opening the third conference day by answering the question is “Opera Streaming a New Revenue Source?” They will present findings of their joint research project on opera streaming projects of intenational opera houses such as New York City’s MET and Viennese State Opera.

Dagmar Abfalter is a Assistant Professor at the Institute for Cultural Management and Cultural Studies (IKM) at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. She holds a doctoral degree in Social and Economic Sciences from the University of Innsbruck and an MBA in International Arts Management from ICCM/University of Salzburg.  Her major research areas include leadership and strategy in creative and expert environments, experience innovation and new business models as well as other domains of intersection between business and the arts. She currently works on streaming business models for opera and a case study on the Museumsquartier Vienna. Another stream of research deals with qualitative research methodology and innovative research methods. Dagmar has published a book on the construction of success in music theater in German and a range of scientific articles in international peer reviewed journals.

17
Sep
15

Introducing our guests: Serge Poisson-de Haro (HEC Montreal, Canada)

Foto serge_poisson-de-haroThe 6th Vienna Music Business Research Days 2015 focus on “Financing Music in the Digital Age”. International experts and academics discuss new and alternative revenue sources for the music scene such as music streaming for the classic music business, crowdfunding and business angel funding.

Serge Poisson-de Haro and Dagmar Abfalter are opening the third conference day by answering the question is “Opera Streaming a New Revenue Source?” They will present findings of their joint research project on opera streaming projects of intenational opera houses such as New York City’s MET and Viennese State Opera.

Serge Poisson-de Haro is an Associate professor at HEC Montreal. His research interests are primarily in the areas of strategy, artistic organizations management, sustainability and experiential learning methods. He presented his research at leading international conferences in these fields and his publications appeared in journals such as International Journal of Arts Management, Journal of Arts Management Law and Society, Journal of Management Development, Management Decision, Revue française de gestion, Journal of Business Ethics Education, Gestion, among others. He recently published a book Strategic Management of Artistic Organizations (JFD Éditions). He has also published many case studies.

15
Sep
15

Introducing our guests: Bryan Zhang (Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance, University of Cambridge Judge Business School)

Foto Bryan ZhangThe 6th Vienna Music Business Research Days 2015 focus on “Financing Music in the Digital Age”. International experts and academics discuss new and alternative revenue sources for the music scene such as music streaming for the classic music business, crowdfunding and business angel funding.

Bryan Zhang, who is Director of Operations & Policy of the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance of the University of Cambridge Judge Business School will highlight “Alternative Financing for Music” and will give special insights into the international landscape of music crowdfunding in Joseph Haydn-Hall from 11:45-12:30 on October 1st, 2015.

Bryan Zhang is a co-author of four industry reports on the state of alternative finance both at national and international levels. Bryan has advised and consulted for numerous businesses and institutions including the Royal Society of Arts, the British Business Bank, Ben & Jerry’s, the Department of International Development and the European Commission. He is also a Research Fellow in Finance at the Judge Business School.

[Update]: Due to health problems, Bryan Zhang won’t be able to come to Vienna. Instead, Kieran Garvey, Research Programmme Manager of the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance of the University of Cambridge Judge Business School will talk on “Alternative Financing of Music” in Joseph Haydn-Hall from 11:45-12:30 on October 1st, 2015.

09
Apr
14

The Recorded Music Market in Germany, 2003-2013

The German Federal Association of Music Industry (Bundesverband Musikindustrie – BVMI) reported a slight growth of recorded music sales by 1.2 percent for 2013. The main reason for the first increase of music sales in the past 15 years were growing digital music sales by 11.7 percent from 2012 to 2013. At the same time, the physical music sales moderately declined by 1.5 percent to EUR 1.12bn. Whereas CD sales fell by 1.3 percent to EUR 1.0bn, the sales of vinyl records grew heavily by 47.2 percent to EUR 29.0m in 2013. Since the CD has still a market share of 69.8 percent, one should be cautious to speak about a turnaround of the German recorded music market. A stabilization of the physical music sales is unrealistic and the increase of digital music sales has to over-compensate the loss in the physical market segment. Although the revenue from ad-supported and subscription music services increased by 91.2 percent to EUR 68.0m, the single-track download sales fell for the first time by 4.4 percent to EUR 104.0m in 2013, which makes a turnaround scenario highly questionable.

In the following, the future development of the German recorded music market will be analysed based on the BVMI report as well as on historic empirical data.

Continue reading ‘The Recorded Music Market in Germany, 2003-2013’

01
Apr
14

Book review: Chasing Sound by Susan Schmidt Horning

horning rev comp.indd“Chasing Sound. Technology, Culture & the Art of Studio Recording from Edison to the LP” is Susan Schmidt Horning’s dissertation published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2013. As the subtitle indicates it is not only a book on the history of recording technology, but of the evolving recording culture from the early beginning in the last quarter of the 19th century until the advent of multitrack recording in the 1960s. In her book, Schmidt Horning highlights the change from capturing live performances by acoustic and electrical recording devices to music production using recording equipment and the recording studio as integral part of the artistic process. The book focuses on those involved in the recording process: engineers, record producers, arrangers, session musicians and performers, songwriters, studio owners and managers and tells the history of sound recording from their perspectives. Therefore, the author conducted in-depths interviews with contemporary witnesses to catch-up the tacit knowledge embodied in the recording profession and the overall change of the recording culture. In the following, I summarize the seven chapters of the book.

Continue reading ‘Book review: Chasing Sound by Susan Schmidt Horning’




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