Posts Tagged ‘International Journal of Music Business Research

18
Apr
19

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2019, vol. 8, no. 1

The April issue 2019 of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR) opens with the article “Digital enabled experience – the listening experience in music streaming”. Bård Tronvoll, Professor of Marketing at the Business School of Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, analyses the drivers as well as the outcomes of music listening on streaming platforms such as Spotify.

The second article – “An analysis of ticket pricing in the primary and secondary concert marketplace” – by Terrance Tompkins of Hofstra University in New York City is a literature survey on the factors that impact the pricing of concert tickets in primary and secondary markets.

Silvia Donker, who was awarded the best paper in the Young Scholars’ Workshop of the 9th Vienna Music Business Research Days 2018, contributes the third article of this issue. “Networking data. A network analysis of Spotify’s socio-technical related artist network” provides a case study on Spotify’s related artist network of the Dutch drum & bass band Noisia.

This issue rounds up with a book review of “The Music Business and Digital Impacts. Innovations and Disruptions in the Music Industries” by Daniel Nordgård, published as the first volume in the Music Business Research series of Springer Publishing.

 

Volume 8, no 1, April 2018

Editorial by Peter Tschmuck, pp. 4-5

Bård Tronvoll: Digital enabled experience – listening experience in music streaming, pp. 6-38

Terrance Tompkins: An analysis of ticket pricing in the primary and secondary concert marketplace, pp. 39-66

Silvia Donker: Networking data. A network analysis of Spotify’s sociotechnical related artist network, pp. 67-101

Book review by Peter Tschmuck: The Music Business and Digital Impacts. Innovations and Disruptions in the Music Industries by Daniel Nordgård, pp. 102-105

 

 

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31
Dec
18

Music Business Research 2018 – in retrospective

Dear all,

The music business highlight of 2018 was Spotify’s IPO on April 3rd. The public listing of the music streaming service at the New York Stock Exchange was warmly welcomed by the investors with a price per share of US $166 and a market capitalization of US $26.5bn.[1] In the following Spotify’s stock price reached an all-time high of US $196.3 at the end of July – giving it a market capitalization of US $35.3bn. In the meantime, however, Spotify’s stock price lost more than 40 percent and currently the company is worth US $20.6bn.[2] This can only partly be explained by a bearish stock market in the second half of 2018, since the S&P 500 stock exchange index lost just 11.7 percent in the same period. It seems that investors have doubts about Spotify’s business model. The business analysis highlights increasing losses despite a sharply rising number of monthly active users – currently 83m premium subscribers and 109m ad-supported monthly active users.[3] However, the music industry major companies (except Universal Music Group) and the indie label licencing agency MERLIN sold their stakes in Spotify shortly after its IPO at a profit. The recorded music majors are the main beneficiaries of the booming music streaming market, which has grown by 41.1 percent to globally US $6.6bn in 2017.[4]. In-depth analyses of the Universal’s as well as Warner’s business performance highlight that the major companies as well as larger indie labels have increasing revenues and profits due to music streaming.

Beyond Spotify and the booming music streaming, I also want to point at the following music business related topics in 2018:

  • Vivendi’s plans to sell at least 50 percent of Universal Music Group to Liberty Media (owner Sirius XM Radio Inc.), which also bought a controlling stake in US music streaming service Pandora in 2018,
  • the announcement by Chinese Tencent Holdings of an IPO of its Tencent Music Entertainment Group at the New York Stock Exchange,
  • the enactment of the US Music Modernization Act
  • and the fight over Article 13 of the pending EU Copyright Directive.

Continue reading ‘Music Business Research 2018 – in retrospective’

27
Apr
18

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2018, vol. 7, no. 1

The first article of this issue of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR), “Exploring bounty and spread: key changes in the Danish music streaming economy” by Rasmus Rex Pedersen examines the structural effects of the transition to the access-based business model of music streaming, at a time when the global music streaming market is growing and developing quickly. The second article is “Blockchain: A new opportunity for record labels” by Opal Gough, which points to the opportunities for the music industry from blockchain technology, especially the chance to develop an international industry database for musical compositions and sound recordings as well as streamline processes, remove inefficiencies and improve cash flow. The concluding article of this issue is “Compulsory licensing in Ecuador’s music industry: A daring strategy within the new intellectual property law in order to regulate music piracy” by Abner Pérez Marín. This paper examines compulsory licensing in relation to the management of music piracy in Ecuador and describes how, in October 2016, Ecuador’s Government replaced its Intellectual Property Code with the Organic Code of the Knowledge’s Social Economy and Innovation, branded as Código Ingenios. Daniel Nordgård’s book review of “Digital Music Distribution: The sociology of online music streams ” by Hendrik Storstein Spilker rounds up the IJMBR’s April 2018 issue.

 

Volume 7, no 1, April 2018

Editorial by Dennis Collopy, pp. 4-5

Rasmus Rex Pedersen: Exploring bounty and spread: key changes in the Danish music streaming economy, pp. 6-25

Opal Gough: Blockchain: A new opportunity for record labels, pp. 26-44

Abner Pérez Marín: Compulsory licensing in Ecuador’s music industry: a daring strategy within the new intellectual property law in order to regulate music piracy, pp. 45-71

Book review by Daniel Nordgård: Digital Music Distribution: The sociology of online music streams by Hendrik Storstein Spilker, pp. 72-74

 

31
Dec
17

Music Business Research 2017 – in retrospective

Dear readers of music business research blog,

The music streaming boom dominated 2017. Market statistics highlight that music streaming revenue has become the most important income stream for the phonographic industry. The US figures for 2016 highlight a tremendous shift from selling music (CDs and downloads) to accessing music (by streaming services). In the US, music consumers paid for the first time more for music access by ad-supported and paid streaming services (US$ 3.9bn) than for CDs, music downloads and ringtones (US$ 3.5bn). In the UK, the massive growth of music streaming revenue also increased overall recorded music sales in 2016. Gains of £103m in the music streaming segment, thus, compensated not just for the loss of £5.8m of physical sales, but also for the £56m decrease in download sales in a year-to-year comparison, as a long-term analysis of the UK recording sales indicates. We can, thus, expect a further massive growth of music streaming revenue in 2017 also on markets with a still strong physical segment such as Germany.

Continue reading ‘Music Business Research 2017 – in retrospective’

28
Apr
17

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2017, vol. 6, no. 1

This April 2017 issue of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR) features one theoretical and two empirical papers on different aspects of music business research.

In the first article “A methodology for cultural music business research”, Lorenz Grünewald-Schukalla of the University of Applied Sciences of Media, Communication and Management Berlin proposes a promising methodology for cultural music business research. In the second article – “The impact of digitalisation on the recorded music consumption. An Estonian case study” – Juko-Mart Kõlar of the Estonian Business School in Tallinn analyses disparities in recorded music consumption among different age and gender groups in Estonia. The third article by Arilova A. Randrianasolo of the Boler School of Business at the John Carroll University in Ohio and Jeremiah Sala of the University of Missouri in Saint Louis link musicological analyses with econometrics. In “Song product characteristics and music commercial performance”, they investigate how tempo, song key and genre influence a song’s commercial performance. The book review by Daniel Nordgård of “The New Music Industries: Disruption and Discovery” by Diane Hughes, Guy Morrow, Sarah Keith and Mark L. Evans of Macquarie University Sydney rounds up the IJMBR’s April 2017 issue.

 

Volume 6, no 1, April 2017

Editorial by Peter Tschmuck, pp. 4-5

Lorenz Grünewald-Schukalla: A methodology for cultural music business research, pp. 6-34

Juko-Mart Kõlar: The impact of digitalisation on the recorded music consumption. An Estonian case study, pp. 35-50

Arilova A. Randrianasolo & Jeremiah Sala: Song product characteristics and music commercial performance, pp. 51-75

Book review by Daniel Nordgård: The New Music Industries: Disruption and Discovery by Diane Hughes, Guy Morrow, Sarah Keith and Mark L. Evans, pp. 76-78

 

01
Jan
17

Music Business Research 2016 – in retrospective

Dear readers of the music business research blog,

2016 seems to be the pivotal year in the recorded music industry. Although no annual statistics have been published until yet, we can take it for granted that the positive trend of 2015 continued in 2016. In 2015, the global recorded music market expanded by 3.4%. The US-market slightly grew by 0.9% and the German recorded music sales even increased by 4.4%.

The booming music streaming market was of course the main driver for the economic recovery of the recorded music business in 2015 and we can expect a further growth in 2016 and the upcoming year. The revenue growth of the streaming business compensated for the decline in CD sales, despite decreasing music download sales as highlighted in “The fate of the CD – an international CD-market analysis”. However, an in-depth analysis of the statistics unveils very different market dynamics in various countries. Whereas music streaming is the main business of the recorded music industry in Scandinavia, CD sales are still relevant in Germany and in Japan (see “The Music Streaming Market Revisited, 2011-2015”).

Continue reading ‘Music Business Research 2016 – in retrospective’




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