Posts Tagged ‘International Journal of Music Business Research

01
Jan
16

Music Business Research 2015 – in retrospective

Dear readers of the music business research blog,

2015 Music streaming was again the main topic in the music business. In June, Apple Inc. introduced the long rumoured music streaming portal Apple Music to the public. Instead of a freemium tier Apple Music is built around an online radio station – Beats 1 – and enables direct contact between musicians and fans by Artist Connect. Nevertheless, Taylor Swift was not amused. She threatened to withdraw her music catalogue from Apple Music as long as no licensing fees are paid to rights holders in the initial trail period. Apple’s VP of iTunes, Eddy Cue, immediately responded by Twitter to announce that Apple Inc. has changed its mind and “will pay artist for streaming, even during customer’s free trial period”. However, the conflict shows that the discussion on music streaming payments to artists will continue in 2016. An analysis on the blog already addressed that problem – Music Streaming Revisited – the Problem of Income Distribution – and even superstars cannot afford a living from music streaming revenues: Music Streaming Revisited – The Superstars’ Music Streaming Income. It was also highlighted on the blog that the main winners of the music streaming boom are the major recorded music labels which can successfully market their catalogues: Who Benefits from Spotify & Co.?

Before Apple Music was introduced to the public, premium music streaming service Tidal was launched by Jay-Z and 16 further superstars of the music business in March 2015. It remains to be seen if the music fans are prepared to pay a monthly fee of US $19.99 for high fidelity music streaming. The number of subscribers since Tidal’s launch tells a different story.

In November 2015, Google unveiled the first details on YouTube Red. YouTube Red is the successor of Music Key, which never made it out of the beta version. The new streaming service aims to successfully compete with Spotify & Co. 2016 will show if the dreams will come true.

It is striking, however, that all the new music streaming services lack a freemium tier. This nurtures speculations that the end of free music streaming is near what would be applauded by high ranking music industry representatives who regularly clamoured the dismissal of Freemium music streaming models in 2015. It is, however, questionable if a stop of free music streaming is the golden rule for the music business since most of the music streaming markets are not fully developed yet as highlighted in a blog entry: Music Streaming Revisited – the International Music Streaming Market 2014.

Although music streaming seems to stabilize the recorded music markets – see e.g. U.S. and Germany – the first signs of a market consolidations has become visible. The German music streaming pioneer Simfy had to close down and the U.S. based streaming platform rdio went bankrupt in 2015.

Investors, however, do not bet on music streaming services anymore as the panel discussion “Financing Music in the Digital Age” within the 6th Vienna Music Business Research Days highlighted. The international music business research conference that again was held at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna in cooperation with Waves Vienna Festival & Conference also addressed the question in a presentation and panel discussion if streaming is a relevant revenue source for opera houses and concert halls. And the economic relevance of crowdfunding for the music business was analysed in a keynote talk too.

Continue reading ‘Music Business Research 2015 – in retrospective’

27
Oct
15

International Journal of Music Business Research – October 2015, vol. 4, no. 2

For the first time the IJMBR is published  by the International Music Business Research Association (IMBRA) that was founded on Oct. 2nd, 2015 at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna/Austria. The October 2015 issue opens with a fundamental article, “Life is live: Experiencing music in the digital age”, by Beate Flath of University of Paderborn/Germany. She highlights how digitisation has dramatically changed the experience of music reception. Based on Alvin Toffler’s concept of prosumption, she argues that the separation between active music producers and passive music consumers has become porous. José M. Alvarez-Monzoncillo and Juan Calvi of the Rey Juan Carlos University in Madrid/Spain contribute the second article on “Music consumption in Spain: From analogue to digital in the shaping of music”. They argue that consumption of digital music takes place in a new type of mass market, that is even more concentrated than in the decades before. They based their arguments on a comparative study indicating that there is no difference between music consumed on digital channels, on the radio or in physical formats. The October issue closes with “The Evolution of music blogs: From a fan’s passion to a promotional outlet” by Beatrice Jetto of the University of Technology and Charles Sturt University in Sydney/Australia. She argues that record labels “went from suing blogs for digital copyright infringements to collaborating with them for the promotion of their artists”. She highlights four different phases in the evolution of music blogging: (1) the amateur phase; (2) the diversification phase; (3) the promotional phase and (4) the professional phase.

 

Volume 4, no 2, October 2015

Editorial by Peter Tschmuck, pp. 4-6

Beate Flath: Life is live: Experiencing music in the digital age, pp. 7-26

José María Álvarez Monzoncillo & Juan Calvi: Music consumption in Spain: From analogue to digital in the shaping of music, pp. 27-48

Beatrice Jetto: The evolution of music blogs: From a fan’s passion to a promotional outlet, pp. 49-72

 

 

 

06
May
15

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2015, vol. 4, no. 1

The April issue of the International Journal of Music Business Business Research is now available online. This special issue – edited by Martin Lücke (professor at Macromedia University of Applied Sciences Berlin) and Carsten Winter (professor at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media – focuses on the German music economy. In the first article, Helmut Scherer & Carsten Winter (both full professors at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media) discuss success factors for music-based crowdfunding in Germany. Ronny Gey (University Jena), Frank Schumacher, Stephan Klingner (both University Leipzig) and Bettina Schasse de Araujo (Institute for Applied Informatics) highlight the conflict between artistic and economic rationales in a shrinking recorded music market that negatively affects creative and innovative processes in the music industry. In the third article David-Emil Wickström (Pop Academy Baden-Württemberg), Martin Lücke and Anita Jóri (both Macromedia University of Applied Sciences Berlin) discuss the higher education of musicians and music industry workers within the field of Popular Music in Germany.

Volume 4, no 1, April 2015 – special issue on the German Music Economy

Editorial by Martin Lücke & Carsten Winter, pp. 4-8

Helmut Scherer & Carsten Winter: Success factors for music-based crowdfunding as a new means of financing music projects, pp. 9-25

Ronny Gey, Frank Schumacher, Stephan Klingner & Bettina Schasse de Araujo: Buried by administration: How the music industry loses its creativity. An empirical study of German music labels and publishers, pp. 26-54

David-Emil Wickström, Martin Lücke & Anita Jóri: The higher education of musicians and music industry workers in Germany, pp. 55-88

03
Jan
15

Music Business Research 2014 – in retrospective

Dear readers of the music business research blog,

Music streaming dominated the music business year 2014. Taylor Swift attracted global media attention when she pulled her music catalogue from Spotify music streaming service blaming the Swedish company for insufficient royalty payments. She, thus, followed the footsteps of Radiohead’s Thom Yorke and other artists who have criticized Spotify and other streaming services for poor payouts – a fact also highlighted in my blog post “Is Streaming the Next Big Thing? – The artists’ perspective”.

Nevertheless, music streaming has been a booming business model in 2014. Revenues from music streaming increased in almost all markets – e.g. in the U.S., Japan, Germany and Brazil. New services have been launched such as Amazon’s Prime Music and YouTube’s Music Key. And music subscription service Beats was part of the largest takeover in the music industry when Apple purchased Beats Electronics, but mainly for the valuable headphone line. Apple again was in the headlines when it announced that the latest U2 album “Songs of Innocence” was given away for free to all the Apple users – a US $100m marketing campaign for Apple with questionable results.

The business model of music streaming was also one of the main topics of the 5th Vienna Music Business Research Days on “How to Monetize Music in the Digital Age” (October 1-3, 2014), which were held the first time in cooperation with the Waves Vienna Festival & Conference at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. A conference track day supplemented for the first time the Young Scholars’ Workshop and the invited conference day with conference papers presented by academics from Austria, Australia, Brazil, Croatia, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom. In the course of the VMBR-Days the best paper of the Young Scholars’ Workshop was awarded for to Jordana Viotto da Cruz of University 13 Paris and to Esther Bishop of Zeppelin University Friedrichshafen. Both papers are considered for publication in the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR).

Continue reading ‘Music Business Research 2014 – in retrospective’

30
Sep
14

International Journal of Music Business Research – October 2013, vol. 3, no. 2

The latest issue of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR) is online now. In the first article Francisco Bernardo & Luís Gustavo Martins of the Catholic University of Portugal in Porto pose the crucial question of whether, in the digital age, disintermediation is reshaping the music industry and fostering independent approaches to the market. They argue that digital network media enable ordinary people to adopt a do-it-yourself or “DIY” approach to producing and disseminating music by eliminating intermediaries such as record labels. In the following, Ben O’Hare, Head of Higher Education (Music Business) at Box Hill Institute in Melbourne/Australia, argues in an article entitled  “Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Music Business Education” that in these days a music business education is essential to achieve success in the music business and provides valuable theoretical as well as empirical insights. Beatrice Jetto of the University of Technology and Notre Dame University in Sydney, Australia focuses in the last contribution on the relationship between music blogs and the music industry by analysing 18 semi-structured interviews with bloggers specialising in music.

Find all articles as well as the entire journal issue here: https://musicbusinessresearch.wordpress.com/international-journal-of-music-business-research-ijmbr/

 

 

30
Apr
14

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2014, Vol. 3, No. 1

In the current issue of the International Journal of Music Business Research Professor Adolf Dietz, the Senior researcher and former head of the Max-Planck-Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law, Munich (Germany) critically reflects the European Commission’s Proposal for a Directive on Collecting Societies and Cultural Diversity as a missed opportunity. David Allan, Associate Professor of Marketing at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia (U.S.) deals in “Turn it up: That’s my song in that ad” with deals the relevance of popular music for brand and artist awareness in television commercials. Finally, Steven C. Brown, Doctoral Research Student at Glasgow Caledonian University (Scotland) reflects the “Peer production and the changing face of the live album”.

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2014, Vol. 3, No. 1

08
Apr
13

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2013, vol. 2, no. 1

The new issue of the International Journal of Music Business Research is now online. You can read an article by Michael Huber on “Music Reception in the Digital Age – Empirical Research on New Patterns of Music Behaviour” based on a representative survey of music consumption in Austria. In the article “Analysing the Popular Music Audience. Determinants of Participation and Frequency of Attendance” Juan Montoro-Pons et al. show that concert attendance in Spain is driven by by cultural capital accumulated through media participation. Finally, John Fangjun Li highlights the tremendously growing digital music industry in China in a contribution entitled “The Development of the Digital Music Industry in China during the First Decade of the 21st Century with Particular Regard to Industrial Convergence”.

International Journal of Music Business Research, April 2013, vol. 2, no. 1




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