Posts Tagged ‘music industry

21
Dec
15

Call for Papers: 7th Vienna Music Business Research Days 2016

The 7th Vienna Music Business Research Days will be held at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Austria, from September 27 to 29, 2016.

Music Business Research is an inter-discipline at the intersection of economic, artistic, cultural, social, legal, technological and further developments which contribute to the creation/production, dissemination/ distribution and reception/consumption of music. This interdisciplinary nature calls for methodological multiplicity and is open to scholars from all scientific areas.

The conference organizers invite scholars (from the postdoctoral level on) who have a research focus on music business/industry related topics to submit a paper proposal for the conference day on September 28, 2016.

Indicative themes on all music business research areas, include, but not limited to:

  • Self-management and career development (institutional and private) of music artists
  • Past, current and future developments in the music industry (recorded music industry, live music sector, music publishing, music retailing and wholesaling, music instruments industry etc.);
  • Music market research and music charts research;
  • The economic and social situation of musicians as well as the labor market for musicians;
  • The management of musicians and music institutions;
  • The marketing of music;
  • Music branding and sponsoring;
  • Public and private funding of the music sector (including new forms of music funding such as crowdfunding);
  • Case studies on music companies and other music institutions;
  • Legal aspects of the music business (contracts, copyright, competition law/policy etc.);
  • Music licensing and collecting societies;
  • Music media (radio, TV, online-based media etc.);
  • Economic aspects of music genres (classical, pop/rock, jazz, world music markets etc.);
  • Business-related music education;
  • Music export;

Gender issues are welcome and can be included in almost every research topic mentioned above.

 

Submission

Please send an abstract of your proposal to vmbrdays@gmail.com no later than April 30, 2016.

All submissions must include a Title, Authors (names, affiliations, e-mails of all authors and a notation (*) of the corresponding author), an abstract of 1,000-1,500 words and 3-5 keywords. Abstracts must be submitted in English, as a MS Word file (*.doc or *.docx) or *.pdf file, and include:

  • Objectives of the research
  • Brief description of the disciplinary/theoretical context/background
  • Research questions and/or hypotheses
  • Methodology
  • Main or expected conclusions / contribution
  • Main references

Abstracts will be subject to a double-blind peer-review process by an international jury, and authors will be notified of acceptance by June 01, 2016.

Final papers should not exceed 7,000 words (including abstracts, figures, tables, references and appendices) and follow the author guidelines of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR). The best paper will be offered publication in IJMBR.

Continue reading ‘Call for Papers: 7th Vienna Music Business Research Days 2016’

01
Jul
15

Creative Mornings Vienna – Revolutions in the Music Industry

On June 26, 2015, the Creative Mornings Vienna were devoted to the topic “revolution”. I had the honor to talk about the “Revolutions in der Music Industry” at University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. For those who did not read my book “Creativity and Innovation in the Music Industry” yet, can enjoy a short YouTube video version on the Jazz revolution, Rock ‘n’ Roll revolution and the current digital revolution in der music industry: “Revolution in the Music Industry – Creative Mornings Vienna, June 26, 2015”.

You can find more on the concept of the international breakfast lecturing series here: http://creativemornings.com/

06
May
15

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2015, vol. 4, no. 1

The April issue of the International Journal of Music Business Business Research is now available online. This special issue – edited by Martin Lücke (professor at Macromedia University of Applied Sciences Berlin) and Carsten Winter (professor at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media – focuses on the German music economy. In the first article, Helmut Scherer & Carsten Winter (both full professors at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media) discuss success factors for music-based crowdfunding in Germany. Ronny Gey (University Jena), Frank Schumacher, Stephan Klingner (both University Leipzig) and Bettina Schasse de Araujo (Institute for Applied Informatics) highlight the conflict between artistic and economic rationales in a shrinking recorded music market that negatively affects creative and innovative processes in the music industry. In the third article David-Emil Wickström (Pop Academy Baden-Württemberg), Martin Lücke and Anita Jóri (both Macromedia University of Applied Sciences Berlin) discuss the higher education of musicians and music industry workers within the field of Popular Music in Germany.

Volume 4, no 1, April 2015 – special issue on the German Music Economy

Editorial by Martin Lücke & Carsten Winter, pp. 4-8

Helmut Scherer & Carsten Winter: Success factors for music-based crowdfunding as a new means of financing music projects, pp. 9-25

Ronny Gey, Frank Schumacher, Stephan Klingner & Bettina Schasse de Araujo: Buried by administration: How the music industry loses its creativity. An empirical study of German music labels and publishers, pp. 26-54

David-Emil Wickström, Martin Lücke & Anita Jóri: The higher education of musicians and music industry workers in Germany, pp. 55-88

30
Sep
14

International Journal of Music Business Research – October 2013, vol. 3, no. 2

The latest issue of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR) is online now. In the first article Francisco Bernardo & Luís Gustavo Martins of the Catholic University of Portugal in Porto pose the crucial question of whether, in the digital age, disintermediation is reshaping the music industry and fostering independent approaches to the market. They argue that digital network media enable ordinary people to adopt a do-it-yourself or “DIY” approach to producing and disseminating music by eliminating intermediaries such as record labels. In the following, Ben O’Hare, Head of Higher Education (Music Business) at Box Hill Institute in Melbourne/Australia, argues in an article entitled  “Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Music Business Education” that in these days a music business education is essential to achieve success in the music business and provides valuable theoretical as well as empirical insights. Beatrice Jetto of the University of Technology and Notre Dame University in Sydney, Australia focuses in the last contribution on the relationship between music blogs and the music industry by analysing 18 semi-structured interviews with bloggers specialising in music.

Find all articles as well as the entire journal issue here: https://musicbusinessresearch.wordpress.com/international-journal-of-music-business-research-ijmbr/

 

 

14
Jul
14

Is piracy ‘good’ or ‘bad’? – guest post by Steven Brown

Steven Brown is a Doctoral Research Student at Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland. His mixed-methods research into music piracy has appeared in diverse publications including The Psychologist,  Musicae Scientae, and Convergence.

In his guest post he reflects his long experience in the psychology in music piracy research to question if piracy is economically ‘bad’ or ‘good’. He comes to the conslusion that the answer is strongly dependent on the methodology used in the research. This is in line with my findings in the blog series “How Bad is Music File Sharing?”

Read more on Steven’s thoughts on music file sharing research here:

Continue reading ‘Is piracy ‘good’ or ‘bad’? – guest post by Steven Brown’

31
Dec
13

Music Business Research 2013 – in retrospective

 

Dear readers of the music business research blog,

The take-over of EMI’s recorded music arm by Universal Music Group was still on the agenda in 2013. The EU Commission ordered Universal Music to divest EMI Recording Ltd. (including EMI’s Parlophone label group, with the exception of the Beatles), Chrysalis (but without the Robbie Williams catalogue) and Mute Records, EMI and Virgin Classical as well as the local EMI branches in France, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Poland, Czech Republic/Slovakia and Universal Greece. Thus, the Parlophone Music Group was sold to Warner Music for GBP 487m. The EU Commission eventually cleared the deal in May 2013.

2013 was also the year of booming music streaming services. Led by Spotify, music streaming services reported a growing number of users and increasing revenues. The market entry of Apple with iTunes Radio and Google with All Access raised the expectations of a turnaround in the recorded music market. In the series of six blog entries “Is Streaming the Next Big Thing?”, I tried to assess if these expectations are legitimate from the labels’, artists’, consumers’ and streaming services’ perspective on the basis of an international market analysis.

The booming music streaming market was the perfect starting point for the 4th Vienna Music Business Research Days “The Future of Music Licensing” (June, 20-21, 2013). The role of collecting societies in the digital age was as well discussed as the EU directive on collective rights management and the need for a comprehensive database of music licences. In the course of the VMBR-Days the best paper of the Young Scholars’ Workshop was awarded for the second time. Sisley Maillard of the Université Telecom ParisTech was awarded for her paper “Consumer Information in the Digital Age: Empirical Evidence from the Spillovers in the Music Industry” as well as Francisco Bernardo/Luis Gustavo Martins of the Catholic University of Portugal in Porto for “Disintermediation Effects in the Music Business – A Return to Old Times”. Both papers are considered for publication in the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR).

In 2013, the second volume of the IJMBR was published with two issues in April and October. The special October issue was entirely devoted to the analysis of the Australian music economy:

Volume 2, no 2, October 2013 – special issue on the Australian Music Economy

Editorial by Patrik Wikström and Peter Tschmuck

Guy Morrow: Regulating Artist Managers: An Insider’s Perspective, pp. 8-35

Phillip McIntyre and Gaye Sheather: The Newcastle Music Industry: An Ethnographic Study of a Regional Creative System in Action, pp. 36-60

Diane Hughes, Sarah Keith, Guy Morrow, Mark Evans and Denis Crowdy: What constitutes artist success in the Australian music industries? pp. 60-80

Volume 2, no 1, April 2013

Editorial by Dennis Collopy and Peter Tschmuck

Michael Huber: Music Reception in the Digital Age – Empirical Research on New Patterns of Musical Behaviour, pp. 6-34

Juan D. Montoro-Pons, Manuel Cuadrado García and Trinidad Casasús-Estellés: Analysing the Popular Music Audience. Determinants of Participation and Frequency of Attendance, pp. 35-62

John Fangjun Li: The Development of the Digital Music Industry in China during the First Decade of the 21st Century with Particular Regard to Industrial Convergence, pp. 63-86

 

In the next section you can find a list of all theses & papers which were added to the blog in 2013, but also recently published studies and books related to music business/industry research are listed:

Continue reading ‘Music Business Research 2013 – in retrospective’

30
Oct
13

Book Review: The Death & Life of the Music Industry in the Digital Age by Jim Rogers

Rogers, 2013, CoverJim Rogers’ PhD-thesis at Dublin City University was recently published under the title “The Death & Life of the Music Industry in the Digital Age” at Bloomsbury/London. He interviewed 30 music business professionals in the UK and Ireland from 2007 to 2010 to answer the main research question if the Internet caused a crisis in the music industry that is signalling its final collapse or if it, in contrast, resulted in an intensive restructuring and reordering within the industry.

He concludes that the music industry has not undergone a fundamental structural upheaval but was reshaped by an evolutionary change. Rogers observes more continuities than discontinuities in the music industry and states that most of the music industry actors do more or less the same things but in a different way. In the following I highlight how the author comes to such a conclusion.

Continue reading ‘Book Review: The Death & Life of the Music Industry in the Digital Age by Jim Rogers’




June 2016
M T W T F S S
« May    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Archive

Facebook

Twitter

Categories

RSS Music Business Worldwide

Blog Stats

  • 312,973 hits

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 377 other followers