17
May
19

Towards a music streaming economy – Scandinavia part 3

Part 1 of the blog series highlights that the Scandinavian countries are the world’s music streaming avant-garde due to a well-established broadband Internet infra-structure, a high smartphone penetration rate and domestic business innovations (see also part 2). The most influential Scandinavian business innovation was Sweden’s Spotify, which was launched in October 2008 at the culmination of The Pirate Bay lawsuit. However, several other services early offered music access to music in Scandinavia. In 2009, Finnish smartphone company Nokia launched the Comes-With-Music service, which allowed unlimited music access for a year on special Nokia Comes-With-Music phones. In the same year, Swedish Sony-Ericsson in collaboration with Norwegian Telenor offered the PlayNow plus service on its special edition of Sony Ericsson Walkman phones (IFPI 2009: 8). However, the mobile phone manufacturers failed to meet the music consumers’ convenience. Nokia’s music was DRM protected until 2010 and limited to special Nokia devices, whereas Sony Ericssons’ music was DRM free, but limited in time and to special devices.

In 2011 both services were, therefore, were discontinued,[1] when Spotify, WiMP and TDC Play started to dominate the digital music market. In 2009, the Danish TDC Play was the first ISP music service offering unlimited music streaming from 6.1 million tracks without any additional costs (IFPI 2010: 8). Spotify’s ad-supported unlimited streaming tier was also bundled in ISP TeliaSonora in Sweden and Finland and the premium tier could be directly paid on the broadband bill (ibid.: 9). WiMP’s subscription service also succeeded in Norway due to its bundling in Telenor’s mobile phone contracts (IFPI 2011: 9).

Consumer convenience, therefore, was the key success factor for music streaming services in Scandinavia. It was easier to access music by a streaming services than downloading music from P2P file sharing networks with the risk of malwares and viruses. Music consumption studies in Norway and Sweden highlight this shift from P2P file sharing to music streaming as outlined in the following analysis.

Continue reading ‘Towards a music streaming economy – Scandinavia part 3’

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24
Apr
19

Towards a music streaming economy – Scandinavia part 2

A series of blog entries tells the story of how the Scandinavian countries have become the forerunners of the music streaming economy and highlights the background of this development. In the second part of the  series on Scandinavian’s way to a music streaming economy technological and business innovations that fostered music streaming are highlighted.

The Scandinavian countries are forerunners in broadband Internet penetration. From 2000 until 2006 the share of households with broadband Internet access increased from almost zero to 70 percent in Denmark and Norway, even to 80 percent in Finland and Sweden. Currently, almost all Scandinavian households have a broadband high-speed Internet access (figure 1).

 

Figure 1: Recorded music revenue and broadband Internet penetration in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, 1996-2017

Source: Wlömert and Papies (2019: 56).

 

Continue reading ‘Towards a music streaming economy – Scandinavia part 2’

18
Apr
19

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2019, vol. 8, no. 1

The April issue 2019 of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR) opens with the article “Digital enabled experience – the listening experience in music streaming”. Bård Tronvoll, Professor of Marketing at the Business School of Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, analyses the drivers as well as the outcomes of music listening on streaming platforms such as Spotify.

The second article – “An analysis of ticket pricing in the primary and secondary concert marketplace” – by Terrance Tompkins of Hofstra University in New York City is a literature survey on the factors that impact the pricing of concert tickets in primary and secondary markets.

Silvia Donker, who was awarded the best paper in the Young Scholars’ Workshop of the 9th Vienna Music Business Research Days 2018, contributes the third article of this issue. “Networking data. A network analysis of Spotify’s socio-technical related artist network” provides a case study on Spotify’s related artist network of the Dutch drum & bass band Noisia.

This issue rounds up with a book review of “The Music Business and Digital Impacts. Innovations and Disruptions in the Music Industries” by Daniel Nordgård, published as the first volume in the Music Business Research series of Springer Publishing.

 

Volume 8, no 1, April 2018

Editorial by Peter Tschmuck, pp. 4-5

Bård Tronvoll: Digital enabled experience – listening experience in music streaming, pp. 6-38

Terrance Tompkins: An analysis of ticket pricing in the primary and secondary concert marketplace, pp. 39-66

Silvia Donker: Networking data. A network analysis of Spotify’s sociotechnical related artist network, pp. 67-101

Book review by Peter Tschmuck: The Music Business and Digital Impacts. Innovations and Disruptions in the Music Industries by Daniel Nordgård, pp. 102-105

 

 

29
Mar
19

Towards a music streaming economy – Scandinavia part 1

It’s no accident that Spotify was launched in Sweden during the culmination of the The Pirate Bay lawsuit in 2008. Spotify was promoted as the legal alternative to P2P files haring and the Swedish music consumers were the perfect test market for such a Freemium music service. Sweden’s neighbouring country Norway was in a similar position: wealthy inhabitants, a high penetration of broadband Internet access and a passion for music. Therefore, the Swedish digital entertainment company Aspiro launched the music streaming provider WiMP (the later Tidal) in cooperation with the Norwegian telecommunication company Telenor and music retailer Platekompaniet in Norway in February 2010. Two months later WiMP also started in Denmark as the first music streaming service for PC, Mac and Android mobile.[1] However, in December 2009, the Danish telco TDC had added an unlimited streaming option to its music download service TDC Play (now YouSee Musik) in cooperation with tech company 24-7 Entertainment.[2] Thus, all three Scandinavian countries were pioneers in establishing a music streaming economy. The fourth Scandinavia country, Finland, lagged behind for some years, but in 2017 the Finnish sound recording market was as streaming-lined as its Scandinavian neighbours.

 

Figure 1: The global phonographic market in 2017 by digital market shares

Source: After IFPI Global Music Report 2018.

 

A series of blog entries tells the story of how the Scandinavian countries have become the forerunners of the music streaming economy and highlights the background of this development. In this blog post a comparative analysis of market figures for all Scandinavian countries are presented.

Continue reading ‘Towards a music streaming economy – Scandinavia part 1’

01
Feb
19

Towards a music streaming economy – an international market analysis

The music business year 2018 was shaped by the ongoing streaming boom. In April, Spotify has been listed as a stock market company and shortly thereafter the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) reported a 41.1 percent increase of global music streaming revenue to US $6.6bn for 2017. Music streaming has become the most relevant revenue source with a market share of 38 percent in the phonographic industry (compared to physical sales 30 percent, downloads 16 percent, performing rights 14 percent and synchronisation rights 2 percent).

In 2011, the global revenue from music streaming was comparatively low with a market share of 4.1 percent and a revenue of US $600m. However, the countries, for which IFPI provides data, have not developed uniformly as highlighted in the following analysis.

Continue reading ‘Towards a music streaming economy – an international market analysis’

17
Jan
19

Call-for-papers: 10th Vienna Music Business Research Days, September 11-13, 2019

 

About

The 10th Vienna Music Business Research Days will be held at mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Austria, from September 11 to 13, 2019.

Music Business Research is an inter-discipline at the intersection of economic, artistic, cultural, social, legal, technological and further developments which contribute to the creation/production, dissemination/ distribution and reception/consumption of music. This interdisciplinary nature calls for methodological multiplicity and is open to scholars from all scientific areas.

The conference organizers invite scholars (from the postdoctoral level on) who have a research focus on music business/industry related topics to submit a paper proposal for the conference day on September 12, 2019.

Scholarly submissions on this year’s conference theme “The Future of Music Business” are equally welcome as on other aspects of music business research.

Indicative themes include but are not limited to:

  • Past, current and future developments in the music industry (recorded / live / publishing / retailing / wholesaling, etc.)
  • Economic and historic analyses of music markets, charts or audiences
  • Issues in marketing and/or branding music, musicians or music institutions
  • Aspects of musical and musician diversity in music business
  • Critical discourses on the economic, social and cultural contributions of (live) music
  • New products, formats and business models in the music sectors
  • Strategies and strategizing of musicians and music institutions
  • Situatedness and power in musician labor markets
  • Agency and social practices in the music business
  • Legal issues in the music business (contracts, copyright, policies) from an international perspective
  • Fit for the market? Acquiring skills for the music business
  • Doing things right! New solutions for fairness and transparency in the music business
  • Entrepreneurial musician und music entrepreneurs
  • An age of disruption? Technological developments in the music industry

 

 

Submission

Please send an abstract of your proposal to vmbrdays@gmail.com no later than April 29, 2019.

All submissions must include a title, authors (names, affiliations, e-mails of all authors and a notation (*) of the corresponding author), an abstract of 1,000-1,500 words and 3-5 keywords. Abstracts must be submitted in English, as a MS Word file (*.doc or *.docx) or *.pdf file, and include:

  • Objectives of the research
  • Brief description of the disciplinary/theoretical context/background
  • Research questions and/or hypotheses
  • Methodology
  • Main or expected conclusions / contribution
  • Main references

Abstracts will be subject to a double-blind peer-review process by an international jury, and authors will be notified of acceptance by May 20, 2019.

Final papers should be sent before July 31, 2019. They should not exceed 7,000 words (including abstracts, figures, tables, references and appendices) and follow the author guidelines of the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR). You may also want to consider publication in IJMBR after the conference.

 

Important dates

April 29, 2019              Abstract submission deadline

May 20, 2019               Notification of acceptance

July 31, 2019                Submission deadline for full papers

September 12, 2019    Conference day (paper sessions)

September 13, 2019    Conference day for invited speakers on “The Future of Music Business”

For students at all levels of the MA & PhD a doctoral colloquium (Young Scholars’ Workshop) will be held as part of the 10th Vienna Music Business Research Days on September 11, 2019. Find a separate call for papers here.

 

Registration Fee

Registration (ntry.at/vmbrdays2019) will be open from May 15, 2019 to August 31,2019. There will be no refund after this date. The registration fee includes conference attendance, reception, coffee breaks and lunch on conference days as well as the Heurigen-Dinner on September 13, 2019. Discounts for students and members of IMBRA will be available!

Full registration fee

Until July 31, 2019 (early bird) Euro 175,-
After July 31, 2019 Euro 225,-

 

Contact

Dagmar Abfalter (mailto: vmbrdays@gmail.com)

Department of Cultural Management and Gender Studies (IKM)

mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna

Anton-von-Webern-Platz 1, 1030 Vienna, Austria
https://musicbusinessresearch.wordpress.com/vienna-music-business-research-days-2/

 

 

17
Jan
19

Call-for-papers: 9th Young Scholars’ Workshop of the 10th Vienna Music Business Research Days 2019, September 11, 2019

The Young Scholars’ Workshop, as part of the 10th Vienna Music Business Research Days (Vienna, Austria), invites once again young researchers to submit paper abstracts of all disciplines exploring questions that help understand economic and managerial problems as well as processes of the music business sector and in the field of music management. There are many questions that call for investigation and need to be discussed in music business research, for example:

  • What drives innovation in the music business sector?
  • How can we scientifically understand and differentiate music business models?
  • What do we know about critical success factors? Have success factors changed over time – and has music business (entrepreneurship) changed in general?
  • What rationalities affect this very “personal” industry?
  • What does it mean to be self-managed in the music business?
  • What can we learn about the customer’s willingness to pay for music recordings or related goods?
  • Who will control the future music market, e.g., startups or Apple?
  • How can we understand the role of brands and the music industry?
  • And how can music business research support efforts for innovative business models?
  • What issues of gender, class or “race” exist in a music business context? How are they dealt with?

 

These research questions are not exhaustive, papers may also address other aspects.

The workshop organizers Prof. Dr. Peter Tschmuck (University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna) and Prof. Dr. Carsten Winter (Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media) strongly encourage submissions from students at all levels of MA & PhD. Students are supposed to work on their MA or PhD thesis and discuss it with senior researchers of music business research.

Abstracts (of about 1,000 characters) are due by April 29, 2019, and full papers (15-30 pages) are due by July 31, 2019. Only abstracts and papers submitted on time will be considered.

A maximum of 6-8 papers will be selected for presentation to guarantee a workshop atmosphere. The sessions will combine paper presentations and discussions including interactive elements. Information on the acceptance of the paper proposal will be sent until May 20, 2019, at the latest.

Please email your submission to youngscholars@imbra.eu

Paper proposals and final papers must be submitted as pdf documents and should include contact information, at least affiliation, e-mail address, telephone number and postal address of the author(s).

 

Organized by

 

 

 

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