06
May
15

International Journal of Music Business Research – April 2015, vol. 4, no. 1

The April issue of the International Journal of Music Business Business Research is now available online. This special issue – edited by Martin Lücke (professor at Macromedia University of Applied Sciences Berlin) and Carsten Winter (professor at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media – focuses on the German music economy. In the first article, Helmut Scherer & Carsten Winter (both full professors at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media) discuss success factors for music-based crowdfunding in Germany. Ronny Gey (University Jena), Frank Schumacher, Stephan Klingner (both University Leipzig) and Bettina Schasse de Araujo (Institute for Applied Informatics) highlight the conflict between artistic and economic rationales in a shrinking recorded music market that negatively affects creative and innovative processes in the music industry. In the third article David-Emil Wickström (Pop Academy Baden-Württemberg), Martin Lücke and Anita Jóri (both Macromedia University of Applied Sciences Berlin) discuss the higher education of musicians and music industry workers within the field of Popular Music in Germany.

Volume 4, no 1, April 2015 – special issue on the German Music Economy

Editorial by Martin Lücke & Carsten Winter, pp. 4-8

Helmut Scherer & Carsten Winter: Success factors for music-based crowdfunding as a new means of financing music projects, pp. 9-25

Ronny Gey, Frank Schumacher, Stephan Klingner & Bettina Schasse de Araujo: Buried by administration: How the music industry loses its creativity. An empirical study of German music labels and publishers, pp. 26-54

David-Emil Wickström, Martin Lücke & Anita Jóri: The higher education of musicians and music industry workers in Germany, pp. 55-88

16
Apr
15

The Recorded Music Market in Germany, 2003-2014

The recently published figures of the recorded music market in Germany show a picture of stability. Compared to 2013, the recorded music sales increased by 1.8 percent to EUR 1.48bn as reported by IFPI Germany (Bundesverband Musikindustrie – BVMI) in the latest Yearbook on the Recorded Music Industry in Germany (Jahrbuch zur Musikindustrie in Deutschland). The still fast growing revenues from the music streaming business are the main reason for the modest overall sales growth of 1.8 percent. The revenues from music subscription rose by 77.0 percent to EUR 108.0m compared to 2013. In the same period, however, long-play download sales (mainly digital album sales) declined for the first time – by1.4 percent to EUR 145.0m. The single track download sales again decreased – after a sales decline of 4.6 percent in 2013 – by 7.4 percent to EUR 100.0m. The physical music sales are still declining by 1.7 percent in 2014. Nevertheless physical sales are still dominant on the German recorded music market with share of 74.9 percent (without revenues from neighbouring rights collecting society GVL and from synchronisation). The CD is still the most important audio format of the recorded music market in Germany with sales of EUR 985.0m and a market share of 66.7 percent.

The details of the development of the recorded music market in Germany from 2003-2014 are highlighted in the following analysis.

Continue reading ‘The Recorded Music Market in Germany, 2003-2014′

26
Mar
15

The recorded music market in the US, 2000-2014

2014 seems to be the watershed year in the recorded music business in the US. According to the recently published sales figures (shipment value) of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the revenue of US $1.87bn from music streaming (SoundExchange distributions as well as subscription & ad-supported streaming) accounted for 41.4 percent of the digital music sales. Whereas music streaming revenue increased by 30 percent in 2014, digital album sales declined for the first time by 6.7 percent to US $1.16bn and digital singles’ sales by 10.2 percent to US $1.41bn. Additionally, the CD has become a by-product with a market share of just 27.4 percent (US $1.86bn). CD sales again decreased by 12.7 percent in 2014. All in all, digital music sales accounted for 66.5 percent of the US $6.78bn overall recorded music sales (except synchronization royalties). The total recorded music revenue slightly decreased by 0.4 percent compared to 2013.

 

In the following long-term analysis of the recorded music market in the US, the digitization process in past fourteen years is also highlighted as well as the tremendous change in the digital music market segment.

Continue reading ‘The recorded music market in the US, 2000-2014′

25
Feb
15

Who Benefits from Spotify & Co.?

The recently published Ernst & Young study that was commissioned by the French music industry body SNEP highlights the revenue split of a premium subscription of EUR 9.99 Spotify, Deezer and other comparable music streaming services. The study’s results confirm the conclusions drawn in the blog series “Is Streaming the Next Big Thing?” that – beside the music consumers – the (major) record labels are the main beneficiaries of the current boom of music streaming. In contrast, the musicians get just a small piece of the streaming pie and the streaming services for their part have severe problems to establish a sustainable business model. In the following, I would like to highlight and to comment on the main results of the study.

Continue reading ‘Who Benefits from Spotify & Co.?’

17
Feb
15

The Music Industry’s Fight Against Napster – Part 4: Napster’s Slow Death

On December 6, 1999, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) sued the first file sharing platform Napster for copyright infringment. This was the start of a still ongoing campaign against file-sharing and related practises. On the occasion of the 15th anniversary of RIAA’s lawsuit against Napster, I would like to retell the story of Napster relying on Joseph Menn’s book “all that rave. The Rise and Fall of Shawn Fanning’s Napster” (2003) as well as on court documents and press articles.

In the fourth and last part the slow death of Napster is highlighted when Bertelsmann AG bought the sued file sharing service and failed to turn it into a sustainable business model.

Continue reading ‘The Music Industry’s Fight Against Napster – Part 4: Napster’s Slow Death’

26
Jan
15

The Music Industry’s Fight Against Napster – Part 3: The Trial

On December 6, 1999, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) sued the first file sharing platform Napster for copyright infringment. This was the start of a still ongoing campaign against file-sharing and related practises. On the occasion of the 15th anniversary of RIAA’s lawsuit against Napster, I would like to retell the story of Napster relying on Joseph Menn’s book “all that rave. The Rise and Fall of Shawn Fanning’s Napster” (2003) as well as on court documents and press articles.

In part 3 the trial on the preliminary injunction against Napster is highlighted that eventually let to the shut down of the file sharing service in summer 2001.

Continue reading ‘The Music Industry’s Fight Against Napster – Part 3: The Trial’

03
Jan
15

Music Business Research 2014 – in retrospective

Dear readers of the music business research blog,

Music streaming dominated the music business year 2014. Taylor Swift attracted global media attention when she pulled her music catalogue from Spotify music streaming service blaming the Swedish company for insufficient royalty payments. She, thus, followed the footsteps of Radiohead’s Thom Yorke and other artists who have criticized Spotify and other streaming services for poor payouts – a fact also highlighted in my blog post “Is Streaming the Next Big Thing? – The artists’ perspective”.

Nevertheless, music streaming has been a booming business model in 2014. Revenues from music streaming increased in almost all markets – e.g. in the U.S., Japan, Germany and Brazil. New services have been launched such as Amazon’s Prime Music and YouTube’s Music Key. And music subscription service Beats was part of the largest takeover in the music industry when Apple purchased Beats Electronics, but mainly for the valuable headphone line. Apple again was in the headlines when it announced that the latest U2 album “Songs of Innocence” was given away for free to all the Apple users – a US $100m marketing campaign for Apple with questionable results.

The business model of music streaming was also one of the main topics of the 5th Vienna Music Business Research Days on “How to Monetize Music in the Digital Age” (October 1-3, 2014), which were held the first time in cooperation with the Waves Vienna Festival & Conference at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. A conference track day supplemented for the first time the Young Scholars’ Workshop and the invited conference day with conference papers presented by academics from Austria, Australia, Brazil, Croatia, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom. In the course of the VMBR-Days the best paper of the Young Scholars’ Workshop was awarded for to Jordana Viotto da Cruz of University 13 Paris and to Esther Bishop of Zeppelin University Friedrichshafen. Both papers are considered for publication in the International Journal of Music Business Research (IJMBR).

Continue reading ‘Music Business Research 2014 – in retrospective’




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